Research

A unifying theme of Duke's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) is its interdisciplinary nature, characterized by significant funded research programs that actively engage Duke faculty from across Pratt, the applied sciences and medicine. The interdisciplinary nature of Duke ECE is well aligned with the increasing international trend toward a breakdown of traditional disciplinary boundaries; such an interdisciplinary focus has also been widely encouraged by industry and government. Our department has four primary research areas.

Signal and Information Processing

A particular strength is in the area of signal and information processing (SIP), embodied by successful collaborations between ECE, statistics and applied mathematics. Duke has long been a leader in SIP research with defense applications, and there has also been a significant expansion into biomedical applications, in collaboration with the Duke University Medical Center.

Computer Engineering

Computer engineering plays a critical role in enhancing the computing power of modern systems, impacting all areas of engineering, science and commerce. Duke ECE has played a leading role in developing new classes of computing architectures and systems, particularly with a highly successful core of young faculty. The computer engineering group in ECE has led development of significantly enhanced collaboration between ECE and computer science at Duke.

Information Physics

Duke ECE is also the home of international leaders in information physics research, embodied in pathbreaking programs in metamaterials, quantum devices, and optical systems. This interdisciplinary research involves the design, fabrication and testing of revolutionary new devices, based on novel physical concepts, with a foundation in rigorous computational modeling in electromagnetics and quantum mechanics.

Microelectronics, Photonics, and Nanotechnology

The fourth research area, microelectronics, photonics and nanotechnology (MPN), is highly vertically integrated, ranging from innovative materials, devices, and interconnects, through chip scale integrated systems. MPN research includes revolutionary microfluidic systems, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, integrated optics, sensors, integrated multifunctional systems, energy conversion devices, and quantum sensors. The MPN research is highly interdisciplinary, and focused on design, fabrication through Duke’s Shared Materials Instrumentation Facility (SMIF) cleanroom and characterization facility, and device and system test.

December 06, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. – Microscopic metallic cubes could unleash the enormous potential of metamaterials to absorb light, leading to more efficient and cost-effective large-area absorbers for sensor applications or energy-harvesting devices.
November 12, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. –  The first working “cloaking” device reported by Duke University electrical engineers in 2006 worked like a charm, but it wasn’t perfect. Now a member of that laboratory has come up with a design that ties up one of the major loose ends from the original device.
August 30, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. – By measuring the unique properties of light on the scale of a single atom, researchers from Duke University and Imperial College, London, believe that they have characterized the limits of the ability of metals to be used in devices that rely on the enhancement of light. 
July 05, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. -- GPS has been a tremendously successful technology for positioning users in outdoor environments. But attaining GPS-like accuracy indoors has eluded telecommunication researchers for years. That is, until now, according to a Duke University researcher. In the last few years, several...
June 20, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. -- By synchronizing 98 tiny cameras in a single device, electrical engineers from Duke University and the University of Arizona have developed a prototype camera that can create images with unprecedented detail. The camera’s resolution is five times better than 20/20 human vision over...
March 20, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. -- Duke University engineers believe that continued advances in creating ever-more exotic and sophisticated man-made materials will greatly improve their ability to control light at will.