Microelectronics, Photonics and Nanotechnology

Microelectronics, photonics, and nanotechnology (MPN) constitute a research area that has the potential to address many of the grand challenges currently facing society, including improving healthcare by engineering better diagnostic tools, securing the homeland by creating better chemical and gas sensors, and reducing the cost of renewable energy sources by increasing the efficiency of solar energy conversion. Materials, devices, and integrated systems are the foundation to creating the enabling technologies that can address these important, multi-disciplinary challenges.

Therefore, the research thrusts within MPN share in common the creation of new technologies, and we approach this endeavor both experimentally and theoretically. Multi-disciplinary collaboration is a strong research component within our group because we apply the new technologies we create to solve science and engineering problems. In general, the collaborative process occurs using two approaches; basic science and engineering yield novel capabilities for which applications are sought, and fundamental challenges in existing applications are identified and novel solutions are developed. As a result of our approach, graduate students in our group conduct multidisciplinary research that seeks to solve fundamental challenges related to complex problems.

Research strengths in MPN focus on materials and devices that include micro- and nano-fluidic systems, integration of these fluidic systems with optical systems, photovoltaics, nano-optics, photodetectors, lasers and LEDs, optical biochemical sensors (fluidic and aerosol), silicon photonics, integrated circuit design through the MOSIS foundry, CMOS circuits, nanostructured materials and devices, and chip scale integrated optical/electrical systems. Strong software design and optimization capabilities in MPN are complemented by the fabrication and characterization capabilities in the Shared Materials Instrumentation Facility at Duke, and through ultra mixed signal test facilities in MPN labs. MPN within Duke ECE aims to be the world leader in creating materials, devices, and integrated systems that enable novel technologies related to microelectronics, photonics, and nanotechnology in order to solve fundamental challenges across a broad range of applications. As a result, we will not only help advance society by resolving grand challenges, but, through our collaborations, we will give an “unfair advantage” to researchers, particularly our collaborators, who use our technologies to enhance their own programs.

Examples of application areas that benefit from strong on-campus research collaborations include:

  • Micro- and Nano-fluidics (School of Medicine) 
  • Biological and Chemical Sensors (Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy) 
  • Biomedical Imaging (School of Medicine, Biomedical Engineering)

Microelectronics, Photonics and Nanotechnology Faculty

Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Professor Brooke's expertise is in multi-disciplinary, team-oriented collaborative research involving co-design and co-development of hybrid analog, digital, and optoelectronic information processing systems. He has conducted a research program in applications for ultra-compact optical sensors,...
John Cocke Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Edmund T. Pratt , Jr. School of Engineering
William H. Younger Professor of Engineering in the Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. School of Engineering
Lord-Chandran Professor of Engineering in the Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. School of Engineering
Microfluidic systems for lab-on-a-chip applications based on electrowetting technology. We are primarily focused on applications, such as a chip to detect malaria, a chip to do DNA sequencing by synthesis, a chip for printing artificial tissue constructs and live cells. We also are investigating...
Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
J. A. Jones Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. School of Engineering
Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Professor Massoud is interested in ultrathin gate dielectrics for CMOS ULSI. His interest span the technology, phyiscs, modeling, simulation, and characterization of ultrathin-oxide MOSFETs. He has led a research program in the modeling and simulation of quantum-mechanical carrier tunneling in...
Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
James B. Duke Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Nanomaterials resulting from quantum confinement in three dimensions, known as nanoparticles or quantum dots, exhibit unique characteristics compared to conventional, bulk materials because of their small size, and because nanomaterials can be tailored to exhibit desired properties by controlling...