Centers and Labs

Centers

Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics

The goals of the Institute are to: train the commercial, technical and academic leaders of next generation broadband technologies; pioneer the establishment of photonics as an information science; and pioneer new approaches to industrial, governmental and interacademy collaboration. Research themes include quantum optics, opto-electronics, information spaces, and biophotonics.

Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics

CMIP advances the basic understanding of electromagnetic metamaterials, exploring their capabilities and limitations across the electromagnetic spectrum.

Labs and Research Groups

Carin Lab
Computer Achitecture Group

The Duke Computer Architecture group performs research on a variety of topics, often in collaboration with the systems group. Their research often requires re-examining the interface between hardware and software, designing new interfaces as technology and workloads change.

Cummer Lab
Duke Self Assembled Systems Group

They study the design and fabrication of nanostructures as applied specifically to the fabrication of future computing systems: devices-to-computer architecture.

Duke Imaging and Spectroscopy Program

The Duke Imaging and Spectroscopy Program is a computational optical sensors research program affiliated with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics and the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University. DISP uses physical layer coding, generalized sampling and nonlinear signal processing to build optical imaging and spectroscopy systems spanning x-ray to radio wave frequencies.

Digital Microfluidics Lab

Digital microfluidics is an alternative paradigm for lab-on-a-chip systems based upon micromanipulation of discrete droplets. Microfluidic processing is performed on unit-sized packets of fluid which are transported, stored, mixed, reacted, or analyzed in a discrete manner using a standard set of basic instructions. In analogy to digital microelectronics, these basic instructions can be combined and reused within hierarchical design structures so that complex procedures (e.g. chemical synthesis or biological assays) can be built up step-by-step. And in contrast to continuous-flow microfluidics, digital microfluidics works much the same way as traditional bench-top protocols, only with much smaller volumes and much higher automation. Thus a wide range of established chemistries and protocols can be seamlessly transferred to a nanoliter droplet format.

The Home Depot Smart Home @Duke

The Duke Smart Home Program is a research-based approach to smart living sponsored by the Pratt School of Engineering. Primarily focused on undergraduates, the program encourages students from different academic disciplines to form teams and explore smart ways to use technology in the home.

Integrated Nano and Micro Systems
Liu Group
Network and Imaging Science Laboratory

A key theme of ongoing research in the Network and Imaging Science Laboratory is data-starved inference for point processes. This comprises the development of statistically robust methods for analyzing discrete events, where the discrete events can range from photons hitting a detector in an imaging system to groups of people meeting in a social network. When the number of observed events is very small, accurately extracting knowledge from this data is a challenging task requiring the development of both new computational methods and novel theoretical analysis frameworks.

Sensor Array and Multipath Signal Processing Lab

The Sensor Array and Multipath (SAM) Signal Processing Lab is concerned with the extraction of information from signals carried by acoustic or electromagnetic waves propagating in complex media.

David R. Smith Research Group

Dr. David R. Smith is currently the William Bevan Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Duke University and Director of the Center for Metamaterial and Integrated Plasmonics.

SMIF - Shared Materials Instrumentation Facility

The Shared Materials Instrumentation Facility (SMIF) provides researchers with high quality and cost-effective access to advanced materials characterization and fabrication capabilities. The facility is operated as a multidisciplinary shared use resource, and is available to Duke University researchers from the various schools and departments as well as to external users from other universities, government laboratories, and industry. SMIF is an official Duke University recharge center open to all trained students, staff, and faculty, and is used for both research and educational purposes. 

Systems Networking Research Group (SyNRG)
Statistical Signal Processing Applied to Cochlear Implants and Subsurface Sensing

Our research is in the area of physics-based statistical signal processing algorithms, and we are actively engaged in two general application areas: (1) Investigating human perception and developing robust remediation strategies for a variety of communication impairments or limitations; (2) developing robust sensor-based algorithms for the remote detection and identification of potentially hazardous buried objects, such as unexploded ordnance (UXO) and landmines.

Stiff-Roberts Research Lab
Trivedi Lab
Ultra Mixed Signal Lab

VLSI Research and Design Center